Courses for Spring 2022

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
LALS 073-401 "The Arts of Rebellion": 21st Century Creative/Critical Latinx Production Ricardo Bracho TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course explores the complex and fruitful relationship between literature and the visual arts, including painting, sculpture, installations, and performance art. COML073401, THAR073401, ARTH299401, CIMS073401, ENGL073401
LALS 093-401 Latinx Environmental Justice Teresa Gimenez MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding. SPAN093401, ENVS093401, URBS093401, ANTH093401
LALS 115-401 American Race: A Philadelphia Story (SNF Paideia Program Course) Fariha Khan TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course proposes an examination of race with a two-pronged approach: one that broadly links the study of race in the United States with a multi-disciplinary approach and also simultaneously situates specific conversations within the immediate location of Philadelphia, home to the University. The broad historical examination advances key concepts of race and racialization, explores key theoretical methodologies, and highlights major scholarly works. For example, students will engage with the study of race through Africana Studies, Asian American Studies, and through Latin American & Latinx Studies. Readings and methodologies will introduce students to critical issues in education, in literature, in sociology, and with methods in oral history, archival work, and ethnography. Most importantly, this extensive approach highlights the impact of race across multiple communities including Black Americans, immigrant populations, and communities that are marginalized to emphasize connections, relationships, and shared solidarity. Students are intellectually pushed to see the linkages and the impacts of racism across and among all Americans historically and presently. As each theme is introduced a direct example from Philadelphia will be discussed. The combination of the national discourse on race, with an intimate perspective from the City of Philadelphia, engages students both intellectually and civically. The course will be led by Fariha Khan but guest instructors with varied disciplinary backgrounds and guest speakers from local community organizations. Each instructor not only brings specific disciplinary expertise, but also varied community engagement experience. ASAM115401, URBS115401, SOCI115401, SAST115401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Designated SNF Paideia Program Course</span>
LALS 165-401 The Asian Caribbean Rupa Pillai TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course complicates prevailing understandings of the Caribbean and extends the boundaries of Asian America by exploring the histories, experiences, and contributions of Asians in the Caribbean. In particular, we will focus on the migrations of Chinese and Indian individuals to Cuba, Trinidad, Jamaica, and Guyana as well as how their descendants are immigrating to the United States. We will examine the legal and social debates surrounding their labor in the 19th century, how they participated in the decolonization of the region, and how their migration to the United States complicates our understandings of ethnicity and race. Ultimately, through our comparative race approach, we will appreciate that the Caribbean is more than the Black Caribbean, it is also the Asian Caribbean. ASAM165401, GSWS165401, SAST166401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Crse Online: Sync & Async Components</span>
LALS 197-401 Era of Revolutions in the Atlantic World Roquinaldo Ferreira MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM This class examines the global ramifications of the era of Atlantic revolutions from the 1770s through the 1820s. With a particular focus on French Saint Domingue and Latin America, it provides an overview of key events and individuals from the period. Along the way, it assesses the impact of the American and French revolutions on the breakdown of colonial regimes across the Americas. Students will learn how to think critically about citizenship, constitutional power, and independence movements throughout the Atlantic world. Slavery and the transatlantic slave trade were seriously challenged in places such as Haiti, and the class investigates the appropriation and circulation of revolutionary ideas by enslaved people and other subaltern groups. HIST197401, AFRC197401
LALS 208-401 International Organizations in Latin America Catherine E.M. Bartch TR 03:30 PM-05:15 PM International Organizations (IOs) play a powerful role in mitigating conflict at the global level. What role do they play in solving problems related to global politics, economic development, corruption, inequality and civil society in Latin America? How much power, influence and control do they possess in the region? This course examines the role and impact international organizations have had on Latin America since the mid-20th century. After a review of theoretical and methodological perspectives on the significance of IOs in international relations, students will examine the workings, issues and often controversies surrounding IOs in Latin America, including the IMF, World Bank, UN, OAS and ICC as well as regional organizations such as the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and area trade blocs and agreements of Mercosur, NAFTA and others. There will be a special focus on the Organization of American States in preparation for the Washington Model OAS students will be invited to attend from April 6-10, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Students attending this simulation will represent the delegation of Dominican Republic. In addition, the course hosts policymakers and scholars as guest speakers throughout the semester. PSCI208401
LALS 210-401 Indigenous Communities and Community Museums: Directions For the Future Richard M Leventhal M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Community museums are becoming more commonplace within indigenous communities throughout the Americas. These museums are created internally, by and for communities, as a way of framing self-identity and representation. The development of these museums is focused upon the need to define and highlight identity and differences between indigenous communities and the surrounding world. These community museums contrast dramatically with other cultural museums where the stories and histories of groups tend to be controlled by the nation-state and professional curators. This course will focus on the nature of indigenous communities, cultural representation, and identity with a focus upon the modern Maya communities of southern Belize. In addition, museums and community museums, world-wide, will be examined and analyzed. What are the different models of community museums and what is the process for the development of such museums? Is the only de-colonized museum one created and framed within and by the community? Seminar format with weekly discussions, readings, and a final research paper. There are no pre-requisites for this course and a background in anthropology is not required. This course will be connected to a community museum project in Indian Creek, Belize where travel and work will be initiated over the summer of 2021. This course is recommended but not required for participation in summer research program in Belize ANTH209401
LALS 231-402 Culture and Identity of the Lusophone World TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics vary. For current course description, please see department's webpage: http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/portuguese/undergraduate/courses.html PRTG221402 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
LALS 235-401 Latinos in United States Emilio Alberto Parrado M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latio immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possililities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born. SOCI266401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">An Academically Based Community Serv Course</span>
LALS 238-401 Modern Spain: Civil War and Postwar, 1930-1970 Antonio Feros TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This RESEARCH SEMINAR is divided into three parts. Part I centers on the Spanish CIVIL WAR, 1930-1939. The beginnings of the conflict, the main causes and motivations, the debates in the international arena, the main events and ideologies, some of the main characters, personal experiences (men and women) during the war, violence and repression. Part II focuses on the consequences of the Civil War (1939-1970), both from internal and international perspectives - the constitution of the Francoist regime and its internal politics; the repression of political dissidence; the situation of the Francoist regime during WWII and during the Cold War, how political and cultural dissidence started under Franco's regime, the social history of Spain, and the construction of the historical memory of the Civil War. Part III, Research and Writing: this course is designed to model the research and writing process professional historians use, beginning with a paper proposal and bibliography of primary documents and secondary sources. It then proceeds through the various stages of the research process to produce drafts of the essay and finally the finished essay. All written work is for peer review. HIST238401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=LALS238401
LALS 240-401 Topics in Lusophone Culture - Society and Visual Arts MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary. For current course description, please see department's webpage: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc CIMS232401, PRTG240401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course Online: Synchronous Format</span>
LALS 273-401 The Immigrant City Domenic Vitiello M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course focuses on immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. We survey migration and community experiences among a broad range of ethnic groups in different city and suburban neighborhoods. Class readings, discussions, and visits to Philadelphia neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, refugee resettlement, and local, state, and national immigration policies. The class introduces students to a variety of social science approaches to studying social groups and neighborhoods, including readings in sociology, geography, anthropology, social history, and political science. Ultimately, the class aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of immigration and its impacts on U.S. cities and regions; 2) a comparative understanding of diverse migrant and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with policies and institutions that seek to influence immigration and immigrant communities. URBS270401, SOCI270401 Society sector (all classes)
LALS 310-401 Transdisciplinary Environmental Humanities Marilyn Howarth T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Emergent transdisciplinary fields, such as the environmental humanities, reflect a growing awareness that responses to contemporary environmental dilemmas require the collaborative work of not only diverse scientists, medical practitioners, and engineers, but also more expansive publics, including artists, urban and rural communities, social scientists, and legal fields. This course is inspired by the need to attend to environmental challenges, and their health, justice, and knowledge production implications, as inherently social concerns. The class is co-taught by faculty from the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine, and will address the challenges and possibilities of working across disciplinary boundaries, building collaborative affinities, and negotiating frictions between diverse methodologies and epistemological approaches. Dr. Kristina Lyons from the Department of Anthropology brings years of experience collaborating with soil scientists, small farmers, indigenous communities, lawyers, and judges in Colombia on watershed restoration projects, soil degradation, toxicity, and the implementation of socio-ecological justice. Dr. Marilyn Howarth is a medical doctor from the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology of the School of Medicine and has experience engaging the public, legislators and regulators around environmental health issues affecting the quality of air, water, soil and consumer products. Through their different lenses, they will foster interdisciplinary environmental collaboration and scholarship by engaging students in discussions and research that bring together the arts and sciences regarding issues of urban air pollution, soil remediation, deforestation, and water contamination, among other environmental health problems. This inaugural course seeks to explore environmental humanities on the global scale. Using Dr. Lyons' deep insight and valuable connections to communities in Colombia, we will explore the experience of environmental degradation, opportunities and challenges for mitigation, and socio-environmental health implications there while placing these issues in conversation with U.S. public health, regulatory and political frameworks and community experiences on similar issues. A comparative exploration of environmental justice in both Colombia and the U.S. will be infused into much of the discussion. This class offers a unique opportunity for students from engineering, natural and social sciences, humanities and the arts to learn to converse and collaborate around pressing socio-environmental and public health issues. ANTH310401
LALS 326-401 Dispossession & Territorial Recovery Among Indigenous Peoples in S. America W 08:30 AM-11:30 AM This seminar will focus on contemporary dynamics of dispossession, territorial claims and territorial recovery involving indigenous peoples in South America. Drawing on cases from different countries (particularly from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia and Colombia), we will examine, in historical perspective, processes of territorial dispossession, socio-environmental conflicts, collective action, and struggles for territorial recovery and recognition set against the policies of settler colonial nation-states and economic activities that tend to evict people from their lands. More specifically, we will focus on actions carried out by indigenous peoples and movements to fight territorial dispossession, recover and protect their lands. Particular attention will be paid to the period marked by the growing visibility of the indigenous movements in South America, from 1970s to the present. The perspectives and strategies of indigenous peoples and movements regarding their territorial rights and projects of living well will be considered within the broader framework of identity, ethnicity and land issues. In that sense, the course will draw connections to the actions carried out by landless peasants and other groups. By devoting our attention to different contexts through the region, we will be able both to understand specific situations and identify underlying dynamics. ANTH327401
LALS 356-401 The Brazilian Black Activism From Slavery To the Present Paulo Ramos TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The objective of this seminar is to provide to the students an overview of the history of black activism in Brazil. We will examine several forms of racial conflict, focusing on the afro-Brazilian ways of organization. We will explore the main periods and organizations of black activism, such as the abolitionism, the Brazilian Black Front, the Experimental Black Theater, the Black Unified Movement and the Quilombolas' movement. Through this exploration, the classes will investigate the relationship between black organizations, black thinkers and the circulation of black ideas across Americas, Africa, and Europe. We will also examine how the Brazilian black movement has elaborated values of democracy and equality, handling notions of class, race and nationality. AFRC456401, SOCI456401
LALS 359-401 Nutritional Anthropology Caitlin A. O'Connell TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The course is an introduction to nutritional anthropology, an area of anthropology concerned with human nutrition and food systems in social, cultural and historical contexts. On the one hand, nutritional anthropologists study the significance of the food quest in terms of survival and health. On the other hand, they also know that people eat food for a variety of reasons that may have little, if anything, to do with nutrition, health, or survival. While the availability of food is dependent upon the physical environment, food production systems, and economic resources, food choice and the strategies human groups employ to gain access to and distribute food are deeply embedded in specific cultural patterns, social relationships, and political and economic systems. Thus, nutritional anthropology represents the interface between anthropology and the nutritional sciences, and as such, can provide powerful insights into the interactions of social and biological factors in the context of the nutritional health of individuals and populations. Because food and nutrition are quintessential biocultural issues, the course takes a biocultural approach drawing on perspectives from biological, socio-cultural and political-economic anthropology. Course content will include: a discussion of approaches to nutritional anthropology; basics of human nutrition; food systems, food behaviors and ideas; methods of dietary and nutritional assessment; and a series of case studies addressing causes and consequences to nutritional problems across the world. ANTH359401, URBS359401
LALS 388-401 Cyborgs, Robots, and Gadgets: Technologies in Hispanic Cinema Reyes Caballo-Marquez MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc CIMS388401, SPAN388401
LALS 393-401 Latinx Environmental Justice Teresa Gimenez MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding. SPAN393401, ENVS393401, URBS393401, ANTH393401
LALS 396-401 The Boom in Latin American Literature Jean O'Bryan Knight MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN390401
LALS 396-402 El Desierto: the Desert in Latin American Literature and Film Ashley R Brock TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN390402, CIMS390402
LALS 397-401 Journeys North: Immigrant Narratives and Popular Culture At the Crossroads Angel Diaz-Davalos TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN396401
LALS 398-401 Food in Mexican History: A Multidisciplinary Approach Maria Victoria Garcia Serrano TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN397401
LALS 425-401 The Resiliency and Impact of Latinx Cultural Expressions in the U.S. Johnny Irizarry T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the resiliency and impact of Latinx cultural and artistic contributions, esthetics, expressions and institution building in the United States from the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will explore how Latinxs culturally define being "American", and how their artistic expressions fit and influence the creativity and productivity of American and global arts & cultural expressions. We will also examine Latinx interactions of race, culture, society, economy and politics in the U.S. SOCI425401
LALS 533-401 Soci Race and Ethnic Courtney E Boen F 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Race and ethnicity are, above all, both converge as system of ideas by which men and women imagine the human body and their relationships within society. In this course we will question the concept of race and ethnicity and their place in modern society (1500 - 2020). While the course reviews the pre-1500 literature our focus will be on the last 500 years. This course reviews the research that has contributed to the ideas about ethnicity and race in human society. The review covers the discourse on race in political propaganda, religious doctrine, philosophy, history, biology and other human sciences. SOCI533401, AFRC533401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">For PhD Students Only</span>
LALS 588-401 Race, Nation, Empire Deborah A Thomas W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony. ANTH587401, GSWS587401, AFRC587401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span>